Tag Archives: Yves Rocher perfume reviews

Yves Rocher Orange Flower Lavender Petit Grain: So Nice I Bought it Thrice

Yes, this little bottle of light as air scent smelled so nice the first time I bought one that I stocked up and bought another three. If fairy wings had a smell, this would be it. Orange flower, lavender and petit grain are three of the prettiest scents you can get (aside form peony, but would that be overkill?), so when you put them all together, you have an impossibly pretty fragrance, that won’t break the bank.

This smells so good that if I didn’t already know its name, I would follow a stranger home until they told me their fragrance. It’s one of those that won’t fill a room but will leave subtle wafts of the prettiest petals in your wake. It’s light, airy and clean and if you like citrus colognes or light florals this is right up your street.

Fragrantica

Lavender can sometimes smell a bit herbally and even a little bit metallic to my nose, but here it is buffeted by gentle orange flower and its close relation petit grain, which is the steam distilled scent of the leaf of the orange tree. Couple this with the orange flower and you can see how the lavender is flanked by sheer piquant petal-like prettiness. I’d swear there was a hint of clean laundry musk in the finish too because this smelsl squeaky clean and pure.

The best bit about this though is that it smells incredible yet costs so little.  I bought mine for £5.90 from the Yves Rocher website and it was buy one get one free. Somehow, I ended up buying four and only spent less than £12., making this incredible value.  The scent of this is so moreish that  our dear friends at YR could have charged me a lot more and I’d still pay , but thankfully I can buy this and still afford my son’s ridiculously top of the range goalkeeper gloves. Not very perfume-y or romantic, but jolly practical, and if I’m happy, everybody’s happy. Trust me.

Stockists

You can buy Yves Rocher Orange Flower Lavender Petit Grain from the Yves Rocher UK website. It is also known by its French name of Fleur D’oranger Lavande Petit Grain. The range is called Les Plaisirs Nature and they are ALL equally good. (OK, this is my favourite, but I’d still buy them all)

Yves Rocher Oui a L’Amour: I say OUI

Yves Rocher is a trusty brand that’s been going strong since 1959. Although there are no branches in the UK, they have a good UK mail order service and send you freebies and extras every time you order. I just ordered 6 x 20ml bottles of fragrances that I will be reviewing soon, but as a bonus, I was also sent a 10ml bottle of latest launch Oui a L’Amour.  This may have been a freebie, or it may have been a blogger perk. I’m not sure. Not to worry. Free perfume is never turned away!

Oui a L’Amour is a simple affair.  It opens with herby Angelica.  If I said this was a herby sort of rose scent you might expect something botanical and green, but actually the Angelica is plump and juicy like a cactus.  It’s neither sweet nor sharp but somewhere in the middle. In fact, when I first smelled this I wanted to call it a fruity floral even though I could see that it wasn’t.

After the Angelica comes the rose and it’s very prominent and beautiful with clean, powdery facets.  After that comes tonka bean (kind of like nutty dried grass) which I mistook for vanilla, and not for the first time. There’s cedar in the base, which comes across as slightly tangy and almost citrussy.

Tie all that together and what have we got? A very clean rose fragrance with touches of juicy garden leaves and a sharp woody finish.

It smells clean and light and very feminine. It’s perfect for work and passes the commuter and the office test with flying colours.

There’s no sickly syrup, no big, rich jasmine overtaking anything,, and none of the usual rent-a-scent suspects that I have come across so often lately.

I say oui to Oui a L’Amour.

Stockists

You can buy Oui a L’Amour from Yves Rocher UK, Yves Rocher.Fr   Extra thumbs up for selling affordable 10ml purse sprays. Opinions are my own.

Follow

Yves Rocher Moment de Bonheur: Roses, Roses, Roses

moment de bonheur

  As you may know, I’m a big fan of Yves Rocher and awaiting a parcel for them later this week.  I love that the quality is high and the freebies and special offers are plentiful.

It’s shame there are no stores in the UK and I have had to make a few blind buys, but I have never been disappointed.  I am particularly fond of Yves Rocher Cléa, which, if you’re a fan, smells a bit like Dove and makes for a deliciously creamy, ambery fragrance. Today I am reviewing Yves Rocher Moment de Bonheur, a rather lovely, simple floral. It opens with drunken rose petals.  By drunken I mean that it reminds me of the rose petal perfume I used to make when I was little.  I would collect rose petals from the garden and keep them in a jar of water.  The resulting perfume would not be um…commercial, but it smelled like rose petals that were on the turn: over ripe if you like and on the point of being fermented.  I’m not painting a pretty picture but in fact the rose scent from the stewed and dampened petals really summed up summer for me.

Moment de Bonheur was in fact created for Autumn and was launched in September 2011.  This would make sense, since the base has a hint of spice and warmth in the patchouli and cedar finish.  However, despite the geranium and green notes, Moment de Bonheur, to me will always be roses, roses, roses: stem, leaves and all. It’s light as a petal and borderline soapy in places, but I love it. If you like rose fragrances you can’t go wrong with this one.

photo by theimaginationtree.com
photo by theimaginationtree.com

Yves Rocher Clea: In the Classic Style

 nd.4907

I often cringe when a perfume is regarded as “Old Lady”. For one thing, the old ladies round my way smell better than the young ladies.  It’s the older crowd that wear Estee Lauder Cinnabar and  Aromatics Elixir, and the younger crowd that smell of Sweet Shops.  Secondly, Old Lady is often used as a term for any perfume with powdery notes or a powdery drydown. My ears prick up when I hear someone describe a perfume as “Old Lady”. To my mind, it usually means a decent scent is up for grabs. It does amuse me however, when I hear my mother describe a perfume as “too Old Lady”. She is 67 this year, and very far from Old Lady herself.

However, “Old Lady” interpretations can vary wildly from nation to nation. I hear from a French friend of a friend that Cacharel LouLou is regarded as Old Lady over in France. Over here in the UK, Yves Rocher Clea would be regarded as Old Lady, with its powdery soapiness, but such is the demand for it in France, that Yves Rocher has kept it going since 1980. That’s no mean feat from Yves Rocher, who decimate ruthlessly.

Clea is an Oriental scent with powdery notes and a soapy drydown.  It is spicy in a muted way, i.e Vetiver and Sandalwood, and has excellent longevity. The bottle is vintage in style, not quite out of fashion, but definitely early 80s: the version I have is clear glass with a gold lid. The strongest notes are amber, roses, patchouli and lily of the valley. Clea smells of clean lotion and clean talc and has just enough of a patchouli hit to pack a punch, albeit a ladylike one in white gloves.  If it was a colour it would be a translucent Ambery glow.

This reminds me very much of  Avon Timeless, and would also go down well with fans of Lanvin Arpege.  In fact, I prefer this to Arpege as it has all the oriental, powdery glory with none of the peaches.

Considering the timeless quality of Clea, going strong for 34 years now, the price is a steal.  Yves Rocher prices vary a lot from week to week, but I bought this alongside a £15 bottle of Yves Rocher Yria and got it for free: otherwise it’s only around £15 for a 75ml bottle.

Stockists

You can buy Clea from the Yves Rocher UK website.

YvesRocher.com
YvesRocher.com

 

Follow