Tag Archives: Seventies perfumes

Chloe Original by Karl Lagerfeld 1975: A Seventies classic at Seventies prices.

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Chloe Original is not to be confused with the current Chloe with a bow around its neck. Chloe Original was created by Karl Lagerfeld in 1975 and is a little bit of a retro classic (although it was not called Original back then. The flotilla of remakes could not have been predicted).

Available for under 15GBP for 50ml (see below), this is easily obtained and a good use of anyone’s perfume budget.  When I first tried it, I found it cloying and too rich with no room to breathe.

However, fast forward a few years and my understanding of scent, and particularly Tuberose, persuades me that this is a very good perfume indeed, and a 1970s classic at that, worthy of standing shoulder to shoulder with its contemporary: Anais Anais.

chloe ead

The most dominant top notes are Aldehydes (just in the beginning before they fade to powder), Peaches (sadly not a favourite) Honeysuckle and flowers galore. Even if Peaches are not your thing, and they’re certainly not my cup of tea, do bear with Chloe because after a while it turns into a Rose, Tuberose, Jasmine flowerfest with a little Sandalwood and Amber to round things off.

For some, the busy-ness of the many flowers may be de trop, but if you “get” or like Tuberose (they are not always mutually exclusive), then you have yourself a bargain. It is a warm, rich floral, as opposed to being a “fresh” floral or a light cologne floral.

chloe 2

Longevity is very good at around eight hours, and the price is right too. You can find Chloe on Amazon for a mere 16.50 for 50ml, although I have seen it even cheaper in High Street stores such as Bodycare and Savers, should you be near a branch. I bought a bottle last year for 9.99 for 30ml in my local branch of Bodycare and they are still there.

I have a soft spot for Seventies perfumes and enjoy wearing them. It reminds me of the decade when I was a child and times seemed more simple.  When they are of good quality such as Chloe Original, it’s worth doling out a tenner for a blast from the past that has aged rather well.

 

 

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Panache : A Welcome Reminder of Perfumed Days Past.

I have an unerring soft spot for 70s perfumes. It was my first ever decade. I was born in 1970, although I only look 27 (*cough*). Women in the 70s and early 80s gave me my blueprint for the future. How they smelled, what they wore, what they did. I looked at them and thought “I too will wear jumpsuits and big sunglasses and smell of that perfume one day, whilst smoking Menthol cigarettes and drinking Babycham”. The scents that I can remember are Avon Sweet Honesty, and Timeless, Tweed by Lentheric, even Tramp by Lentheric (imagine giving that to someone today!) Charlie, Aqua Manda, Coty L’Aimant and of course, Panache.

The Seventies to me is a faded memory of being so short that I lived among a forest of legs, where every street had an Avon Lady, and where my Christmas present every year contained my first ever perfume: Avon’s Pretty Peach.

Having reviewed Elizabeth Arden’s Blue Grass, I thought I’d go back into the past again and review Yardley’s/Taylor of London’s/Lentheric’s Panache (The recipe has changed hands a bit). It used to be made by Lentheric, as did so many of its fellow drugstore classics. I even remember the TV advert where a glamorous woman went to a party and charmed everyone there with her smiley face and nice smell.

The actual one what I have got

Having bagged my bottle for the princely sum of 5.99GBP for 30ml, I couldn’t wait to try it.  I wasn’t disappointed. This a classic aldehyde right down to the tip of its 70s peeptoe sandals. It’s certainly a relation of Blue Grass: the common notes are Rose, Geranium and Aldehydes. However, it’s not quite as sharp as Blue Grass, with a powderiness that calms it down and makes it more wearable. The base notes come through right from the start: Myrrh, 70s style Sandalwood (in spades), and Oakmoss (or a good impression of it). However, despite the wood and spice in the base, this remains a light daytime scent, with all the flowers popping up to keep it pretty and not too in-your-face as Blue Grass can sometimes be. There’s citrus too: Oranges and Lemons, although I can only smell the Lemon, not the Orange.

The overall impression is a floral day time perfume with a powdery background, bedding down into woody notes with a hint of Palmolive.

Image Longevity is a surprise. For 5.99GBP this lasts around eight hours. It is excellent value for money and I would put it in the same category as Avon’s Timeless as a very cheap and massively underrated beauty.

I would love to see a revival of 70s drugstore classics to wipe out the sea of cheap vanilla and berries that seems to be everywhere.  Whatever you do this week, do it with Panache.

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