Tag Archives: perfumes from the eighties

Welcome to Mood Scent Four: First Love Perfumes!

The Good Old Days- photo from youbeauty.com

Do you remember your first love? I’m talking about perfume of course, not Morten Harket or Patrick Swayze (Just me? Surely not!).

Fragrance has been proven to give your memory a powerful jolt  and one sniff of these first loves and I can tell you what I was wearing, where I was going and what I was doing as far back as the late eighties.

Welcome to Mood Scent 4!

MoodScent 4 is a blogging collaboration in which four perfume bloggers from four different countries write on the same theme. My colleagues are meganinsaintemaxime, Tara from ABottled Rose, and Esperanza from L’Esperessence.  Follow the links to find out what their first loves were ( except dear esperanza, who has sadly had to sit this one out. Get well soon!).  Here are mine. Do  any of them match yours?

 

Avon Pretty Peach

The very first fragrance I ever owned was Avon Pretty Peach.  I had a little splash bottle, and splash I did. I must only have been around six or seven years old, but I thought I was the kitten’s mittens smelling of fresh peaches and wearing my very own perfume.  Check out the gorgeous packaging. Who could resist?  Not me!

Avon Eau Givree

In my early teens, it was another Avon fragrance that scented several formative years of uncertainty, crushes and trying to imagine a future where we all wore silver space suits. Space 1999 was on the telly and it felt utterly possible, folks.

Avon had a beautiful green hesperide scent out around this time that was called Eau Givree. It had a frosted pale green bottle, a black lid and silver lettering.  Long since discontinued, my retrospective nose would guess that it was full of grapefruit, bergamot and lemon. Divine in summer!

The Good Old Days- photo from youbeauty.com

The Body Shop White Musk

Surely the scent of every High Street and college in the 1980s, along with the ubiquitous Dewberry! I  remember every bus in Exeter smelling of Dewberry around this time. Personally, I was a Body Shop White Musk girl, and to this day I am never without a bottle. I much prefer the oil to any of the sprays, and find a little goes a long way, not to mention the nostalgia it evokes in men my age!

LouLou. Oui? C’est Moi.

Once I hit seventeen, Cacharel LouLou was invented and I would wear half a bottle at a time (sorry train passengers!) and replace it as casually as if it were shampoo. I still love that plummy aniseed tuberose and the wonderful art deco bottle.

Givenchy Amarige

Towards the end of my LouLou era (I’ve still got a bottle), I experimented with high street launches of thee early nineties and enjoyed a whole summer smelling of Givenchy Amarige.  With its massive sillage, its huge bouquets of jasmine and tuberose, and that soapy green tobacco accord, Amarige still offers much to enjoy, although I  find today’s version a little thinner than the old cloying blousy days of it.

Chanel Cristalle

Once my experimental phase was over, I settled down with Chanel Cristalle from the age of 21 until I was 36. After that I entered a period of olfactory promiscuity and a blog was born. These days? I have a wandering eye and Pretty Peach and Eau Givree have long since gone, along with the bespectacled daydreamer who wore them.

How about you?

What were your first perfume loves? Do you still wear them? Or have they long gone now? I’d love to know.

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Dior Poison: If Darth Vader Was A Woman…

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Dior’s Poison blazed the trail for outrageous 80s scents that everyone still remembers.  They typified the 80s era of greed, glitz and excess. You were nobody unless you had shoulder pads, stilettos, and a mobile phone the size of a house brick. The mantra was “More is More” and Poison added it’s volume to the  clamour of noise to ensure anyone who wore it made an entrance.

Some perfumes are born a myth. Provocative and mysterious since its creation, Poison is Dior’s ultimate weapon of seduction.

Meanwhile, many people were wrinkling their noses at this confusing cacophony of perfume notes that were the olfactory equivalent of entering a nightclub whilst watching a television show and listening to music at the same time.

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photo:Wiki

Sometimes I can look at the notes in a perfume and ascertain whether I would like it or not.  This is not a substitute for trying it on skin, but it often helps me make a list of future Must Tries.

If you look at the notes in Poison, it would still be hard to imagine what it smelled like.  Smelling is believing. There’s Plum, Booze, Amber, Patchouli, Jasmine, Roses, Woods, Honey, Incense, Tuberose, Carnation, the kitchen sink, a cuddly toy, a coffee maker and Uncle Tom Cobley and all. I could go on. I can usually smell a hint of Liquorice too.

Poison will swallow up all  its rivals. In a room of a dozen different perfumes, you would only be able to smell the Poison wearer. It obliterates and dominates. Longevity is as long as a prison sentence and harder to reduce.

However, I will go against the grain and say it’s brilliantly done.  It captures an era in a bottle more effectively than a spell. It takes me back to being 15 years old and watching Joan Collins strut her stuff on Dynasty, whilst over on BBC, JR was pouring himself a large Scotch in the middle of the day, and on the news, Diana was all coy glances and dazzling gowns.  One whiff of Poison and I am there.

The bottle is like Cinderella’s pumpkin: full of dark magic.  I don’t want to smell like this, but I am so glad they made it.

Estee Lauder Beautiful: An Eighties Beauty

paulinaI had my first bottle of EstImageee Lauder Beautiful for my 18th birthday, bought for me by my father. I don’t know how he chose it.  He and Mum had been divorced for eight years by then, so I’m pretty sure it wasn’t her idea.  It was 1988 and the adverts on the TV and in magazines portrayed the beautiful Paulina Porizkova as a bride. Certainly there is something very bridal about this many flowers in one place.

Beautiful pretty much uses so many floral notes that there are none left for anyone else.  Back then I noticed Roses.  These days I notice the Tuberose and the Jasmine more powerfully than any other notes.  In fact I’d go as far as to say that it doesn’t do to break Beautiful down into individual notes.  The cacophony of different flowers almost produces abeautiful-estee-lauder-perfumes new hybrid flower, which, if it existed in real life, you would only ever need one in a bouquet, and nothing else.  That would be plenty, believe me.

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My taste has changed since I was 18, which was 25 years ago.  These days I don’t like my scents so sweet. However the creamy, loud, sweet flowers of Beautiful will always hold a place in my heart as it is the first proper bottle of perfume I ever owned.  I will never forget the thrill of seeing the pink and gold box when I took off the wrapping paper.

The notes include an eclectic range: Amber, Sandalwood, Rose, Carnation, Tuberose, Narcissus, Lilac, Bergamot, Jasmine, Geranium, Marigold…If you saw the notes written down and had never smelled Beautiful, you imagination would be thoroughly confused by all the contradictionsbeautiful.

Creamy flowers, loud and proud, with a warm, sandy finish. It’s not everyone’s cup of tea, but to me, it speaks of the idealised glamour I aspired to when I was 18, when even my spectacles were rose tinted.

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