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Retro Perfecto: 4160 Tuesdays Paris 1948

I’m a sucker for a good chypre. The greener, the mossier and the older, the better as far as I’m concerned.  Serendipity twinned me with a bottle of Paris 1948 today, and reader, a bit of magic took place. Love was in the air and cupid shot me.

A few years back, I tried Paris 1948 and decided it wasn’t for me. I also tried Lady Rose Lion Monkey Unicorn and decided that wasn’t for me either. However, today I received a full bottle of Paris 1948, and by chance, a sample of Lady Rose Lion Monkey Unicorn, and whaddya know? They don’t half go! One complements the other in the way that Guerlain Apres l’Ondee brings out something new in Frederic Malle L’Eau D’Hiver. (Try it, you’ll see. Thanks Lisa!).

My first impression of Paris 1948 is of fresh cut grass in an aged bottle. Have you ever opened a really old bottle of fragrance that has ambered with age and has that sort of bitter powdery thing going on? That’s what Paris 1948 reminded me of.  To me, the dominant note is, believe it or not, basil.  This is a note that is also really prominent in 4160 Tuesdays Lady Rose Monkey Lion Monkey Unicorn, which is why they seem to go together so well.

 

With my brand new 4160 Tuesdays phone sticker.

Paris 1948 opens with citrus, specifically grapefruit, and peaches. Now, I used to have a problem with peaches until the penny dropped and I realised that many of the Grand Dames of fragrances carry peachy nuances: think Lanvin Arpege and Madame Rochas to name but two.  Once this made sense to me, peaches always gave me a

Photo of Paris in 1948 by Edouard Boubat

friendly sort of retro yoo-hoo when they pop up. They certainly make their presence felt here, and that could be one of the reasons why I didn’t like this first-time round.  The basil has a sweet, herbal thing going on that almost borders on the medicinal, but not quite. The flowers come out after the citrus has calmed down a bit and let them get a word in: roses and orange flower and leathery labdanum.

The base to my nose, at least, is a peachy, mossy (VERY mossy) herby, slightly medicinal chypre.  I’m sorry I can’t make that sound more catchy, but it’s true. Call me an addict. Call me a fan.  This is a permanent fixture.

Jacqueline de Francois “Mademoiselle de Paris” 1948

Stockists: I bought this from 4160 Tuesdays and you can too.  If you buy it before tomorrow afternoon (October 27th 2017) then it’s half price. After that it’s still jolly reasonable. This is not a sponsored post.

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4160 Tuesdays: Fruits of the Tree of Knowledge

Adam and Eve by Lucas Cranach the Elder
Adam and Eve by Lucas Cranach the Elder

 

Fruits of the Tree of knowledge has taught me a valuable lesson.  It has taught me to completely disregard the notes a perfume has before trying it.  I used to read the notes and form preconceptions like a fussy eater reading a menu.  But I fell hard for  Fruits of the Tree of knowledge, and  having done so, found myself feeling surprised that  after falling for it, I realised that many of the notes would have been roundly and foolishly rejected by me and may have caused  me missing out on a gem.

This reminds me of maraschino cherries:  that rich, deep almond like taste that enhances any throwback drink, or indeed, tastes wonderful alone, eaten with a cocktail stick straight from the jar.  Described by Maria Angelidou as smelling like “tart cherry jam” its borderline sourness is what gives it its USP, and I remain addicted.

 

www.promosgroceries.com
www.promosgroceries.com

Previously I had tried and rejected cherry scents: I was almost anosmic to Cartier Delices de Cartier which faded as soon as it landed on my skin, despite other reviewers reporting twelve hour longevity. I had also turned my nose up at anything containing watermelon or cucumber, but here they are, giving the sour cherries a dewy lightness. I hadn’t much liked raspberries either, but here they smell just right.  I realise I am beginning to sound like my five year old son “There are brown bits on the edge of my egg”, “my sandwiches aren’t triangles”, but I have been taught a lesson.

This is the second time Sarah McCartney has had me learning to love things I would have previously eschewed.  New York 1955 contains ice cream and candy floss, two things would have put me off completely, but the addition of violets made me buy a bottle and wear it with pride.

Fruits of the Tree of Knowledge is a revelation and has made this fussy eater start ignoring the menus.

Stockists

You can buy  Fruits of The Tree of Knowledge ( previously called What Katie Did on Friday Night) from the 4160 website.  You can find further stockists here.  Big kudos to 4160 for making several affordable sample and discovery set options which you can buy here.