Tag Archives: Lanvin Arpege

Retro Perfecto: 4160 Tuesdays Paris 1948

I’m a sucker for a good chypre. The greener, the mossier and the older, the better as far as I’m concerned.  Serendipity twinned me with a bottle of Paris 1948 today, and reader, a bit of magic took place. Love was in the air and cupid shot me.

A few years back, I tried Paris 1948 and decided it wasn’t for me. I also tried Lady Rose Lion Monkey Unicorn and decided that wasn’t for me either. However, today I received a full bottle of Paris 1948, and by chance, a sample of Lady Rose Lion Monkey Unicorn, and whaddya know? They don’t half go! One complements the other in the way that Guerlain Apres l’Ondee brings out something new in Frederic Malle L’Eau D’Hiver. (Try it, you’ll see. Thanks Lisa!).

My first impression of Paris 1948 is of fresh cut grass in an aged bottle. Have you ever opened a really old bottle of fragrance that has ambered with age and has that sort of bitter powdery thing going on? That’s what Paris 1948 reminded me of.  To me, the dominant note is, believe it or not, basil.  This is a note that is also really prominent in 4160 Tuesdays Lady Rose Monkey Lion Monkey Unicorn, which is why they seem to go together so well.

 

With my brand new 4160 Tuesdays phone sticker.

Paris 1948 opens with citrus, specifically grapefruit, and peaches. Now, I used to have a problem with peaches until the penny dropped and I realised that many of the Grand Dames of fragrances carry peachy nuances: think Lanvin Arpege and Madame Rochas to name but two.  Once this made sense to me, peaches always gave me a

Photo of Paris in 1948 by Edouard Boubat

friendly sort of retro yoo-hoo when they pop up. They certainly make their presence felt here, and that could be one of the reasons why I didn’t like this first-time round.  The basil has a sweet, herbal thing going on that almost borders on the medicinal, but not quite. The flowers come out after the citrus has calmed down a bit and let them get a word in: roses and orange flower and leathery labdanum.

The base to my nose, at least, is a peachy, mossy (VERY mossy) herby, slightly medicinal chypre.  I’m sorry I can’t make that sound more catchy, but it’s true. Call me an addict. Call me a fan.  This is a permanent fixture.

Jacqueline de Francois “Mademoiselle de Paris” 1948

Stockists: I bought this from 4160 Tuesdays and you can too.  If you buy it before tomorrow afternoon (October 27th 2017) then it’s half price. After that it’s still jolly reasonable. This is not a sponsored post.

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IScentYouADay Turns Four! It’s my Blogaversary.

 

#smellfie
#smellfie

Four years ago today I decided to start a blog about something I was passionate about.

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My very first review was Lanvin Arpege

In that four years I have learned to love things I didn’t used to like, go off things I once loved,  and try things I’ve never tried before. I don’t want to scare you away by using the word “journey” but that’s what it’s been and that’s what it still is.   I never give up seeking treasure and thunderbolt moments and  even when I get them,  I am still thirsty for more.

 

The best bit has been meeting you lovely readers, albeit via the Internet. I have never met such a lovely or more generous bunch of folks. With your comments, likes, suggestions and shared memories and anecdotes, you have made every moment worthwhile. It’s been a tricky couple of years on the personal front, and I can honestly say that focussing on this has really helped me, even on those days when negative thoughts block out the sunshine.

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The worst bit? Oh, that’s easy. The worst bit was smelling Etat Libre D’Orange Secretions Magnifiques. No contest, right Lisa?

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It’s time to pay it forward, so watch this space for several giveaways.  It’s the least I can do to say thank you.

Here’s to having fork handles on my cake!

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Robert Piguet Baghari 2006

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 From the House that brought us Fracas and Bandit comes this Autumnal Oriental Aldehydic treat.

I can’t pretend to know if this Baghari is better than the vintage, as I haven’t smelled it, but the 2006 certainly smells very vintage, with an old fashioned powdery finish and a cosy depth that you won’t find on any modern perfume counter.

In fact, I found Robert Piguet Baghari to have aspects of Coty  L’Aimant with its aldehydic opening and rich, creamy finish. It also smells a little similar to the fabulous, much mourned Avon Timeless- a powdery Oriental so good that Avon doesn’t want you to have it anymore.  Baghari also has some notes in common with a current cold-day favourite of mine: Lanvin Arpege. All in all, since I love all three of the perfumes it resembles, Robert Piguet Baghari is a rather marvellous little treasure.

Top notes are Aldehydes, Bergamot and Orange Blossom

Middle notes are: Rose, Jasmine, Iris and Violet

Basenotes are Amber, Musk, Vetiver and Vanilla.

Out of the notes listed on Fragrantica, I would say the Aldehydes, Jasmine, Rose, Amber and Vetiver stand out more than others.  I did not detect any Violet (shame) nor any Iris (hurrah!), but the overall combination of notes is delightful.

The difference between this and Arpege is that firstly, Baghari lacks the Peachyness of Arpege (which I could do without, but I overlook it in this case) and secondly: the fact that Baghari has a sort of dried fruit finish. The Aldehydes never seem to leave, and if you add the touch of  Jasmine to Amber and  Vetiver, it leaves an almost sherry-like afterglow, which is far from unpleasant.

Purists would say this isn’t a patch on the vintage, but I say hurrah for a 2006 refurb that smells like it should only be worn whilst doing the Charleston and  using a cigarette holder.

By the way, Baghari is very expensive at around £104 for 100ml, so if you are rich in spirit but poor of purse, treat yourself to some L’Aimant or a drop of Arpege instead. Much more reasonably priced and not a bad sub as subs go.

Grès Cabaret: It’s Rose. It’s Musk. It’s Gorgeous.

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I’m a fan of Parfums Grès, I even have the much derided set of Marlene Dietrich fragrances, as well as beautiful Cabotine and Leathery/Spicy Cabochard ( see my earlier review). However, I was so deeply disappointed in a Cabotoine Flanker, Cabotine Rose, that it made me cautious about buying a Grès blind.

On this occasion, I bought a very small (7.5ml) bottle of Grès Cabaret on the grounds that if I didn’t like it, I can still pay the mortgage.

When it first goes on (and I have a bottle with no spray so it’s direct onto my skin) it smells almost medicinal, or more specifically, Dental, like the pink mouthwash they give you to rinse with.

The drydown turns into Turkish Delight or those Rose and Violet Creams you can sometimes still get from a good Chocolatier. There is powerful Rose, but the Violet gives it that Turkish Delight quality.

However, it’s the base notes that I really love about Cabaret. From a high pitched Rose it turns into a Patchouli scent with prominent Sandalwood, still with the Rose, some softening Musk, and a bit of pretty Peony, but now it becomes a woodier, more mysterious scent.  It’s almost as if the fragrance encapsulates morning, afternoon and evening all in one.

Although this only seems to be available in the EDP rather than an EDT, I would say it has a weak link in it’s strength and longevity. I’ve had to use nearly half of my little bottle just to get two thirds’ of a day’s wear out of this. When you compare this to say, Lanvin Arpège  (see my review dated January 2nd) where a mere glance at the bottle is enough to scent you  from Dawn to Midnight, then this is a slight letdown in an otherwise rather lovely and unusual fragrance.

Like the rest of the Parfums Grès range, it’s pleasingly affordable, and hey, even Luca Turin really likes it. He hates stuff I love and I hate stuff he loves, but on this, we can agree. Intriguing, interesting and, like all my favourite fragrances, a scent that keeps you guessing. This is a good complex fragrance that is so much more than a Rose Musk.

Oh and sort your website out Parfums Gres. It’s the 21st Century!