Tag Archives: Elizabeth Arden

Elizabeth Arden Green Tea Revitalize: My Treat of The Week

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 Yesterday I went into my local Superdrug to try out the testers by the till, as I often do.  I tried Elizabeth Arden Green Tea Revitalize, left the shop, did a U turn and returned to buy some immediately.

 I was pretty surprised, since I have gone off Elizabeth Arden as a brand, having been unimpressed by so many EA scents, and although I admire the classic Green Tea, I often find that a note of Tea smells too metallic for my liking.

However, wearing Green Tea Revitalize was a different experience altogether.  The first thought that went through my head was Clarins Eau des Jardins. It’s not quite as delicious, but it gives it a damn good run for its money.  It also reminded me of O de Lancome, only without the Mossy base.  It is similar to Clinique Happy with its Orangey Zzzing!  The price of Green Tea Revitalize was a mere £10GBP for a 100ml bottle (sadly I can’t see it online, but check out your local branch if you have one).  Now that’s what I call a bargain.

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fragrantica.com

Yes, it’s a bit cool outside for these delightful summery hesperides, but I was thrilled with my purchase. I never thought I would buy a Green Tea flanker, although I own and like Spiced Green Tea, with its peppery lightness.

Top notes in Green Tea Revitalize are: are Blood Orange, Watermint and Mandarin.  The Watermint thankfully sidesteps the peril of falling into the ozonic/aquatic category. The Oranges are present and correct.

Middle notes are Magnolia ( a favourite of mine), Lotus, Bamboo and Green Tea.  Last time I had Bamboo and Tea in a perfume, I couldn’t offload it quickly enough. I won’t mention any names, (Givenchy Eau Torride). However in Green Tea Revitalize the metallic Tea and Bamboo notes are softened by the lovely citruses and the soft Magnolia until they don’t give that silvery jarring effect anymore. Some perfumes make my teeth jangle such as White Linen and Chanel No 22 (The Perfumed Dandy will surely have the vapours again!). They are metallic and silvery to my nose.  I think there is a term for this but I can’t remember it, perhaps one of my knowledgeable readers knows?

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In any case, Green Tea Revitalize is my  bargain of the week and  despite my having to spray hair and clothes to keep it going (my scarf smells lovely), it was totally worth the ten pound note I handed over, spent within five minutes of coming out of the cash machine.  Plus it’s a  big 100ml bottle. What’s not to love?

Elizabeth Arden Blue Grass: Still Going Strong After 79 Years

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 Named after the Blue Grass of Virginia and created in 1934, Elizabeth Arden’s first fragrance is, in my opinion, rather better than her later, modern offerings. You can keep Sunflowers,  Splendor,  Red Door and Green Tea. I’ll just take the Golden Oldie thanks.

 My grandmother wore Blue Grass and always smelled good. This was her “treat” perfume. I couldn’t resist buying a bottle recently. The formulation has certainly changed some, as I remember Nanna’s bottle smelling more powdery and yet sharper at the same time.

At first spray, this is strongly aldehydic. Aldehydes are chemicals used in soaps and detergents and they are often characterised by a high pitched, soapy scent. First by Van Cleef and Arpels is a textbook example: it has a definite whiff of Palmolive in among the greenery, which is no bad thing at all in my book.

Blue Grass contains a big hit of green Fairy Liquid before retiring into an interesting Lavender, Carnation, and Geranium hybrid. One reviewer said it reminded them of Guerlain Jicky, and that was like a revelation to me. I didn’t get on with Jicky, but I am quite enamoured by Blue Grass. There are definite notes in common: Lavender, Jasmine, Bergamot and Sandalwood to name but a few. However, I find Blue Grass fresher and more vital than Jicky: sharper and more astringent. Blue Grass also has spice, and by that I mean spicy flowers such as Carnation and Geranium, rather than Nutmeg or Cinnamon. In fact, for about five minutes after you spray it, the soapy Carnations throw a loud party, before they calm down and behave themselves.

Ideal for a hot cleavage in stifling weather, this would be great kept in the fridge. To me, this is like a sharp eau de cologne, and being a fan of Hesperides, I’m thrilled to have found this. For a mere £6 from my local Wilkinson, this not only proves that classics can be had for a song, but also proves that you can find an old classic in unlikely places. You might have gone in for some Febreze and a new flask, but you will come out smelling zingy, with a hint of subtle powder.

Some reviewers compare this to the smell of air freshener in a urinal, or liquid soap in public toilets. They’re not wrong, (that’ll be the aldehydes) but to someone who longs for the day a perfume smells like Wright’s Coal Tar Soap, this is right up my street.

Elizabeth Arden Mediterranean: Oops A Daisy!

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Call me superficial but I was drawn to this by the beautiful blue glass and silver lid and tempting advertising campaign. For design and marketing, Elizabeth Arden Mediterranean gets ten out of ten. The image alone makes me imagine freshly sliced oranges, bougainvillea, sunshine and sea spray.

I was therefore hoping for a fragrance that matched those expectations. For example, I love bitter orange  or lemon in a scent and love how a citrus note can cut though the heat on a hot day.  Ô de Lancome  is a perfect example. However, I was very disappointed with Mediterranean and here’s why:

It’s as if they nearly had a fresh, pretty scent for a summer’s day but then added Musk and Peaches. Still feminine but a little on the sweet side, decisions were being made on the final formula when someone split a  cup of Latte over their wrist as they were smelling it. “That’s good, let’s keep that in” they said, and so it was.

What we have now is a musky, peachy, sweet and fluffy perfume with a hint of milky coffee in it. Not at all what I was expecting or hoping for.  Longevity is every poor too. On me it was half an hour. After mingling with the long lasting hoi polloi this week (waving across the room to Coromandel and Cuir Mauresque, see previous reviews)), poor longevity makes me feel cheated, even at this very reasonable price. Look at Body Shop White Musk Oil for instance. It’s currently £11 for 30ml of oil, lasts twelve hours on me and the bottle itself lasts me over six months. Longevity can be had at low prices.

They had the name, they had the packaging, they had the image, but the actual fragrance was lost in a big messy old mess.

Turns out I can forgive Elizabeth Arden though, as they created Blue Grass. Arden is an affordable High Street brand, but I am getting disappointed more frequently by their more modern offerings. This is one of them.  High hopes dashed.  Sorry Meditteranean, I’ll pass.

Celeb Scents 4: Elizabeth Taylor Diamonds and Rubies.

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I always imagined Dame Elizabeth Taylor to smell outrageously glamorous with a hint of booze on her breath. She was always a little de trop. Too many diamonds, too much hair, too much make up, but somehow…somehow she could get away with it because she was Elizabeth Taylor.

Her first fragrance was Passion, launched in 1988, a year after Cher had cornered the then tiny celeb fragrance market with Uninhibited. Celebrity fragrance was fairly new then, but Elizabeth Taylor’s range was created by Elizabeth Arden so it was in good hands. Passion was followed with White Diamonds in 1991, and in 1993 a diffusion line was born: Diamonds and Emeralds, Diamonds and Sapphires and Diamonds and Rubies. Today the range includes Black Pearls, Violet Eyes, Gardenia, Elizabeth Taylor Forever, and several variations on White Diamonds.

This review is for Diamonds and Rubies. Created by famous nose Sophia Grojsman, Diamonds and Rubies is disappointing, yet not surprising. It smells very Eighties, despite being created in the early caring sharing Nineties that was encapsulated fragrance-wise by the advent of Eau D’Issey and Cool Water. Diamonds and Rubies is an old broad on a barstool whilst everyone else sips mineral water and eats salad.

Top notes are listed as being Lily, Red Rose, Lilac, Almond…oh and Peach. Don’t forget the Peach. In fact one spray of this and you will never ever forget the Peach.

The top notes when I sprayed were: synthetic Peach, Talc (Peach Talc of course), Plasticine and Booze: Something like Brandy or Peach Liqueur, at any rate, something sticky and outdated and too sweet.

After half an hour (of wrinkling my nose) I sniffed the drydown. I had more spice this time, in the way that mulled wine is spicy, but still those boozy peaches were sneaking around waiting to drown me when I wasn’t looking.

Not only did I dislike this, but it genuinely baffled me how this dreadful mess could smell good on anyone. It made me think of someone wearing a peach satin peignoir, covered in talc, with matching slippers and a drink problem. It also made me think of the downstairs toilet in a vicarage I once visited.

Cheap can be good or cheap can smell cheap. I’ll leave it to you to guess what category I put this into. Some of the others are much better, I like White Diamonds, but this turkey doesn’t do a Dame justice.

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When Celebrities Try and Make Scents: The Celebrity Fragrance Boom

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I tried resisting. I tried dismissing them as bandwagon wannabes, but the tide was too strong. The fact is, when celebrity fragrances are made by the likes of Coty and Clarins, then you can’t help but sit up and take notice.

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When the tide becomes a tsunami, it’s worth looking into. Are they all just also-rans or are some celebrity fragrances serious contenders?

It was the late Dame Elizabeth Taylor who is generally credited with bringing out the first celebrity perfume, Passion” in 1988. From the House of Elizabeth Taylor we had Passion, White Diamonds, Violet Eyes, Diamonds and Rubies, Diamonds and Sapphires, Diamonds and Emeralds, Gardenia, Elizabeth Taylor Forever, and Black Pearls. So pretty much her entire bedroom. I shall write about some of these at a later date. Made by Elizabeth Arden, the fragrances had excellent pedigree and few could ever call Dame Elizabeth tacky or cheap (although in private she could tell a dirty joke that would make a sailor blush).

However, In fact it was Cher who brought out the first celebrity fragrance in 1987, called, not surprisingly, Uninhibited.

Not long afterwards, in 1997, Antionio Banderas brought out Diavolo, and when JLo dipped herImage toe in the scented water in 2002 with J-Lo Glow, the tsunami was starting to gather speed.

Today, the market is flooded. Everybody from reality stars to pop stars, actresses and athletes are bringing out their own range of fragrances. There are too many to ignore, so we may as well get stuck in. Resistance is futile.

This week, I will be donning my aviators, getting a stalker, and refusing interviews: Yes, I’m going all celeb on you. I will only be reviewing celebrity fragrances for the next week. As always, my reviews are subjective and I am only giving my personal response to a scent. And as always, I am always interested in yours too.

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