Tag Archives: best rose fragrances

Floris White Rose: Perfection

white rose

I have in my possession a small sample of Floris White Rose, and if I can possibly engineer it, I will soon have a full size bottle. Not only is this a dream-come-true sort of fragrance for me, but it has the loveliest whimsical background. Created way back in the early 1800s ( I can’t find the exact year), this was worn by Florence Nightingale, and rumoured to have been presented to Lady Emma Hamilton by Admiral Nelson. Now that’s what I call an impressive backstory.

Rumoured fan: Lady Emma Hamilton
Rumoured fan: Lady Emma Hamilton

Despite its fascinating heritage, this smells surprisingly modern. Roses have been done in every possible permutation within the fragrance industry. I’m certainly not saying this is a bad thing- quite the opposite-but a good rose scent has to be clever enough to stand apart from the competition, and this one does. White Rose had me all a-quiver.

White Rose has many layers. It opens with a burst of roses, which are never allowed to dominate. The carnations vie for attention straight away and this becomes a great double act. The carnations are, in turn, softened up by gentle violets and subtle clean musks. You can find sobering iris in there, as well as warm amber, but it’s those violets that kept calling my name. The carnations add  a grown up spikiness to it. The musk softens the base and the amber warms it all up.  Round this off with a delicate powdery finish and you have an uplifting musky floral that knocked my socks off. Every note works in chorus with the others, seguing from one to the other until it finds a stunning harmony. It’s clean, pretty, feminine and brought out shameless greed in me. I’m on a mission to own a big size one.

Longevity is excellent at around eight hours.

floris shop telegraph

Stockists

You can buy Floris White Rose from Floris, John Lewis or Amazon UK.

Photo credits

Top photo: Fragrantica. Photo of Lady Emma Hamilton by talesofcuriosity.com. Photo of Floris by The Telegraph.

 

Friedemodin Rosée de Nuit

Friedemodin
Friedemodin

Inspired by our childhood gardens in northern Sweden and Germany, we invite you on our olfactory journey. Insert the key and enter through the heavy wooden door to find yourself in the wild enchanted garden surrounded by the beautiful scents of green leafy plants, jasmin and fresh herbs.

 

Friedemodin is the brainchild of Elisabeth Modin and Nina Friede.  The collection of four scents encapsulates their combined love of travel and fragrance.  Previously on this blog I have reviewed Vertine and Jardin Mystique, both of which were excellent, and today I am reviewing Rosée de Nuit.

pinterest
pinterest

Incongruously, there are no roses, as you would expect.  However, I could swear there was a whisper of lovely satin rose petal in the background.  There is a light airiness about the Friedemodin collection that reminds me of watercolour paintings.  If you read the notes in each perfume, you would  think these would be hard hitters with monster sillage, but in fact they are gentle and even ethereal.

www.123rf.com
www.123rf.com

Rosée de Nuit has definite woody notes and comes at this from several angles:  there’s teak, there’s “Woodsy notes” (thanks Fragrantica!) and there’s sandalwood and allspice.  But overall, this is gentle petals in a sylvan surrounding, with a hint of spice floating on air.

Maybe it’s the patchouli or the violet or the combination of both, but this is an incredibly elegant feminine perfume that makes me feel wonderful.

Stockists:

Friedemodin Rosée de Nuit is available online from the website, or from Harvey Nichols.  Further stockists are listed on the website here.

Andy Tauer PHI Rose de Kandahar-It’s Here!

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I am an unabashed fan of Andy Tauer. That doesn’t mean I blindly love everything he does: for some reason Reverie au Jardin disagrees with me, but I’d pretty much take a Tauer scent any day of the week.

What I love about Tauers is that Andy is a one man show.  He’s not a boardroom full of shirts looking at focus groups and trends.  He doesn’t have to go through a comittee and he’s not part of a global organisation (apart from having a distribution partner).  He’s a lone wolf and that makes things very interesting right from the start.

The development of PHI Rose de Kandahar has been well documented via Andy’s blog and Facebook page and it’s finally available in the UK.  This is a limited edition as Andy’s vat of Rose de Kandaher absolute is not bottomless (hence its inclusion in the “Collectibles” range). So now I finally have my treasured sample. Was it worth it?  Oh yes.

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fragrantica.com

PHI Rose de Kandahar has a Middle Eastern richness to it. Initially it’s honeyed roses and almonds and dried apricots: it reminds me of a scented Souk. At first this edible combination was very Turkish Delight, just for a moment.  But what happens next is that it transforms into, unless I’m mistaken, something not unlike a good Arabian Oud.  I often find Oud too strong for me, but in Rose de Kandahar it’s like a robust backdrop to something altogether more delicate. The irony is that there is no Oud in it, but the combination of tobacco, ambergris, vetiver and patchouli gives this a very rich and almost prickly base.   It’s like serving an aromatic Bacchanalian feast on a rough granite table. The contrast of the rough with the smooth enhances the delicacy of the ingredients.

Here are the notes as listed on Fragrantica:

 apricot, cinnamon,
bitter almond, bergamot

Rose of Kandahar essential oil,
Bulgaria rose absolute, Bourbon geranium, dried tobacco leaves.

patchouli, vetiver, vanilla,
tonka beans, musk, ambergris.

 There is an interesting Feel Good back-story to this.  The Kandahar roses that produce this absolute were grown in Afghanistan by farmers that have been subsidised to produce roses instead of growing plants that provide the base materials for drug use (“Hungerhilfe”). In other words, Make Roses, Not Drugs.

The wonderful fragrance alone is reason enough to love this, but  add the milk of human kindness and  you have just one of the many reasons to love PHI Rose de Kandahar.

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