Tag Archives: best perfume for young people

Yardley London: English Bluebell

bluebellyardley

I’ve always been a fan of Yardley and I will correct anyone who says “old lady” in the same sentence.  Yardley gave us the beautiful 60s style chypre that is Jade, and my favourite violet scent: Yardley April Violets. In fact, one of the reasons I love Yardley so much is that they do floral soliflores and they are pretty hard to get these days. I am a particular sucker for lily of the valley and reckon it’s about time straight-up, no-messing florals came back into fashion. In my book, they never went out.

www.nhm.ac.uk
www.nhm.ac.uk

Today I am reviewing Yardley English Bluebell.  This is an interesting one because I am very familiar with the smell of bluebell and did not find it here, as such. However, this did not prevent me from liking it and this review is going to be a bit of a fan letter.

English Bluebell opens with peony and bergamot: two lighter than air notes that will perk you up like a spring morning. Peony is the pretty girl who always wear floaty pink tulle and it is used beautifully here. This is feminine right down to its pink ballet slippers. Whilst actual bluebell is absent, its close relative Hyacinth  amkes its presence felt (I’m trying to get Hyacinth Bouquet into a sentence. Patricia Routledge fans will understand). The hyacinth is present and correct and gives an almost herbal/floral nuance. It’s like a girlier, greener version of lavender. I discerned a hint of lily of the valley, but not as much as I would like.  There is allegedly peach in here somewhere, but peach dodgers will be relieved to hear that I could find none.

mooseyscountrygarden.com
mooseyscountrygarden.com

The base notes include amber, sandalwood, musk and vanilla. Don’t ask me why vanilla’s in there. It must have gone into the wrong meeting by mistake. Vanilla has no place in a pretty spring like floral. There is a soupcon of sandalwood in the base, which isn’t as incongruous as you might think, and the whole thing ends with a flourish of feminine white musk.

This a light and airy crowd pleaser that would pass the commuter test and the office test with flying colours.  It would also make a very good scent for a young girl starting out on a perfume journey. It’s not very bluebell-y, but it is a very pretty floral that will offend nobody and delight everyone.

Stockists

You can buy Yardley London English Bluebell from Boots. It’s not very expensive and comes in a very pretty box.  Mine was under ten quid. Opinions are my own.

 

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Library of Fragrance Orange Blossom and Mango

mangoandorangeblossom

Every fragrance wardrobe needs a good orange blossom.  It’s a fruitier less creamy version of tuberose. It has that hint of faint milky oranges in the background and it smells like petals, all at the same time.

Orange Blossom is widely used in so many fragrances that the landscape of the fragrant firmament would smell very different without it. Library of Fragrance Orange Blossom is one of the best Orange Blossom soliflores I have tried. It’s not the highest priced orange blossom, nor does it come in fancy packaging, but for a sweet, floral, milky hit with a hint of subtle oranges in the background, this is hard to beat. It’s fabulous on its own, but when I layered Library of Fragrance Mango over the top, I had something really addictive going on. Mango smells like a tropical version of Orange Refreshers, which didn’t hurt Eau de Cartier Essence d’Orange, of which it reminded me. See my review earlier in this blog)

I didn’t used to like fruity florals and was a curmudgeon about them, but then the Caramel Sugar Tsunami took over and became such a ubiquitous note in mainstream perfume that I started to miss fruity florals and appreciated them anew.

Fragrantica
Fragrantica

The combination of Orange Blossom and Mango makes for a zingy, fresh and feminine scent that goes together so well that you could Brangelina its name: MangorangeBlossom? Orango? As for me, I couldn’t stop sniffing.

Both Orange Blossom and Mango are fabulous alone and true to the descriptions on their labels, but together, they really take off. My recommendation? Get both.

Stockists

All Library of Fragrance scents are available online from their website. Prices are either £9.99 or £15 for a full bottle, or £10 for a purse spray.

Boots also carries a range instore and online. In Boots you can buy two for £25.

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Chanel Chance Eau Tendre: A Thousand Ballerinas

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I occasionally stop by the Chanel counter on my wanderings, although it’s usually to sniff Chanel No 19 and top up my Cristalle levels.  I am not enamoured of No 5, and usually ignore the others (I know! Shame on me).  However, I was sent a sample of Chanel Chance Eau Tendre by those nice people at The Fragrance Shop and I have to say that it is prettier than I imagined.

Opening with Grapefruit, Quince and Hyacinth, it’s pure and Spring like, almost ethereal.  The Quince is like the lightest of apple/pear scents, and the hyacinth, although noticeable, is done with a delicate hand without going all Zoflora on me.  Little Wonder when you find that the legendary Jacques Polge is responsible.

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photo wiki

There’s no heavy vanilla or red fruit or spice, or in fact anything heavy enough to pin it down.  It’s like a Will’O the Wisp in its delicacy.  It makes me think of ballerinas in white tulle and pink satin ballet shoes and tinkly melodies and everything that is lovely and nice and pretty and girly.

There are not many perfumes that I would regard as only for men or only for women, but Eau Tendre really does seem to be only for women.  Pale, pretty, dancing women that are elusive like nymphs. It’s so pure that it has a comforting feel to it, like freshly washed crisp cotton sheets, or a soft white blanket.

There is allegedly Amber and Cedar in the base, but all I get is a fluffy sort of Musk, light as clouds. This would be an ideal “first perfume” for a teenager.  It’s not remotely provocative. Longevity is in keeping with its floaty image.  Now you smell it, now you don’t.  Pouf! it’s gone.  Like Tinkerbell in a floaty nightie.