Tag Archives: Avon

It’s Avon Week!

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Ding Dong! Reasonably priced beauty products, fragrance and miscellany calling!

Yes trusty old Avon is still at it and going strong. The Avon modus operandi is almost Draconian in this Digital Age.  A brochure is brought to your door, a form is filled in by hand with a pen, and given to a representative that comes back two or three weeks later with your goods. When High Streets are falling like dominoes, it’s almost miraculous that the Avon lady still stands, with a smile.

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Of course the Digital Age hasn’t completely bypassed our trusty friends at Avon. There’s a website where you can order items and leave reviews, and many people text or email their Avon reps now, although that does not exempt them from the long wait for their goods. In fact the long wait is kind of half the fun. Usually by the time I’ve waited three weeks I’ve completely forgotten what I’ve ordered. It’s like a lovely present chosen by someone who knows your tastes perfectly. Which, in a way, it is.

I’ve mentioned Avon in earlier posts, and I’ve promised you an Avon Week. That week is here, dear readers, and it starts now.

 

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Jo Loves…Pink Vetiver

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A combination of Pink Pepper and Vetiver, Jo Loves…Pink Vetiver allegedly has nine different notes. I can smell two, and they are, as you might imagine, Pink Pepper and Vetiver. This is a manly, almost abrasive scent that has excellent longevity. I often find that the Law of Sod dictates that a disagreeable fragrance has excellent longevity to the point where it won’t leave you alone even after a shower, whilst favoured scents can disappear within an hour.

 Pink Vetiver is not dissimilar to an inexpensive fragrance that I bought for my husband a year ago.  Patrick Dempsey Unscripted is made by Avon, and smells rather good on him. As I suspected, the dominant note is Vetiver. Sadly, it smells scratchy and dreadful on me.

Pink Vetiver is unchanging: linear, you could say, and the spiky Vetiver just beds in and won’t go home. I’ve got my pyjamas on, I’m brushing my teeth, but Mr Vetiver just won’t get the hint. I guess I’ll just have to leave him in the dark and go to bed.

It’s not a bad fragrance at all, but if you don’t like Vetiver, you’ll never be friends with this one.

Avon Today: Ding Dong! Loud Flowers Calling!

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It was an Avon brochure that first got me started on perfume. We are talking the 1970s and 80s i.e my childhood. (I’m not old yet). Today’s Avon is renowned for its high end skin care with the Anew Range, a stable of fragrances spread too thinly, great little jewellery sets, and fabulous lotions and potions. The Avon I remember growing up was Pretty Peach  Perfume, along with little peach shaped soaps, Bubble Bath in those big pink bottles that look like a Michelin Man’s leg, and great, affordable perfumes in novelty bottles that have become collectors’ items on eBay.

Who would have thought that with High Streets becoming ghost towns that filling in an order form and waiting two weeks for a rep to bring it to you, would have survived the Age of the Internet? Yet it has. Avon products have moved with the times. Products are constantly updated, and beauty editors are still praising the goods. Sometimes Avon gets it wrong and discontinues favourite perfumes in haste, only to create more lightweights aimed at the younger market (yes, fruity florals, Blah. Blah,. Blah). So it’s Bye Bye Odyssey and Tasha and Hello! to the dreadful Incandessence and Treselle.

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 Avon has friendly nostalgia to thank for a lot of its continuing custom. Indeed my late grandmother was a fan, (she always called it “The Avon”) and being given her Avon order which arrived a few days after her death, was a poignant moment. I still buy Soft Pink Bubble Bath because she often bought it for me at Christmas and it reminds me of her.

As a teen, I was fanatical about wearing Eau Givrée and Odyssey and still remember an ornamental Giraffe filled with Occur! (the exclamation mark is Avon, not me) My mum liked Louis Féraud, and my sister still likes the classic Soft Musk (which you can still get).

Today:The Perfume

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Recently I managed to bag myself an Avon rep again after a hiatus and I couldn’t wait to try out a fragrance that had won a FiFi award: Avon Today. As usual, I was excited on opening the brand new box and the bottle (very like Gucci Flora bottles), and I even liked the fragrance itself for about ten minutes.

Sadly, I actually dislike it now and will be offloading it soon to make more room in my collection. So what’s it like? Well, I love freesias, and there are freesias popping out everywhere during the drydown. Sadly the first spray is a little Zoflora for my taste, but give it a minute. Coupled with the freesias is another more tropical floral note: Strelitzia. I think this is where it goes wrong. The Strelitzia, added to some Hibiscus and even Cacti, kinds of makes it more fruity and tropical which, in my opinion, jars with the English Country Garden opening. It’s very soapy too, and not in a good way. The base notes are supposed to be Cedar and White Musk. I do get a hint of Musk, a mere whisper, but I don’t think a tropical floral is the right place for Cedar. In fact, when it settles, I don’t like this at all. It’s sharp and high and slightly disinfectant-y. So it’s a no from me. However, don’t take my word for it. Many Avon ladies stocked up when rumours of being discontinued surfaced recently, and I don’t mean for their customers. This stuff has a loyal fanbase.

However, if you want a good Avon perfume that keeps its fragrance steady without going off on a tangent, you can do a lot worse than Avon Little Black Dress. It’s light and pretty and doesn’t have that slightly cheap base note that I find common to a lot of Avon perfumes (like Poundland vanilla candles).

If I was Queen of Avon (how I’d love that job!) I would narrow down the overflowing perfume stable to just a few very well made, affordable scents. They’re spreading themselves too thinly, but when they get something right, they get it very, very right.

In the meantime, I look forward to the next brochure. I will never give up on Avon. It’s part of my history and one of the few old school brands left from my childhood as the High Street dies on its knees.

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