Tag Archives: IFRA

Dear Aunty Sam: Your Perfume Problems Answered

 

perfume problem
A Tryst, John William Godward

Earlier this week, I asked you to send me your perfume problems. I then chewed the arm of my glasses and looked studious, whilst reading them,  just like a proper Mumsy Agony Aunt.

rsz_dr_sam

I was so pleased to get so many questions, some of which I answer below.  Incidentally,  I also see questions on my WordPress dashboard which tell me what people type into Google in order to be led to my site.

There are two questions that I see every single day without fail. Yes, my friends, the two most popular questions are:

What’s the best Avon perfume?

What cheap perfume smells good?

Now you may have noticed that these two particular questions have entre blog posts devoted to answering them.  Nobody can accuse me of not giving my readers what they want.

lbdfraiche-image-pic1With that having been said, here are some other questions that I received this week.

I am very grateful to all who sent me a Dear Aunty Sam question. I wish I could tell you that there’s a T-shirt and a mug on the way to you, but I can’t.  I think I may repeat this experience in future, so please do send any questions as they occur to you. I’ll be your olfactory DJ.

avon retro3

Dear Aunty Sam,

Like you, I miss Gucci Envy and only have a little bit left. What can I wear instead when this runs out?

rsz_dr_samA good question and one to which I still seek an answer myself. We’ve asked the Why Did it End? question but the wind took our words away and no answer was given. Meantime, here are some that I find have some of the Gucci Envy notes in common, namely green notes, lily of the valley and hyacinth.

envyJo Loves No 42 The Flower Shop, Chanel Cristalle, Issey Miyake A Scent and Isabella Rossellini Manifesto, if you can find it. Over on Fragrantica, some Envy fans claim that Penhaligon’s Lily of The Valley and Elizabeth Arden Fifth Avenue smell similar, but I haven’t smelled the form er and I don’t agree with the latter, due its dominant freesia, but worth a try to see what you think.

Dear Aunty Sam,

I’ve fallen in love with Yardley’s Polaire. But as ever with Yardley 20 minutes in and unless I’ve gone nose blind I can smell nothing at all. Is there something out there that smells the same, but with actual longevity and a bit more sillage?

rsz_dr_samI haven’t smelled Yardley Polaire recently so I’m working blind here.  However, I notice that the prominent notes are pear, freesia and rose. There are two scents that also contain these notes. One is Dior J’Adore and the other is Elizabeth Arden Fifth Avenue  ( although more freesia than pear) However, if you want to stick with Polaire, there are a couple of things you can do to extend its life.

polaireWhat I usually do is spray my hair.  Hair carries scent very well- usually until bedtime!  However, some people claim this dries hair out.   Secondly, and I’m going to talk boobs here, spray it in your cleavage before you get dressed. As your body heats up throughout the day, you get nice little wafts under your nose. You can also make scent last longer by moisturising skin before applying it. Don’t forget  a quick spray on your lapels or scarf.

There is another theory, however.  Some people say that when a perfume really suits you, you stop being able to smell it.  This is so subjective that I find it difficult to prove, but there may be some truth in it.  Maybe Polaire just really suits you!

 

EDIT: I have since discovered that the ebautiful Celine Dion Sensational is a smellaike too.  This one lasts ages on me.

Dear Aunty Sam

I have begun to make some fragrances.  I have at least three that are absolutely delightful, unlike anything else I’ve ever tried. I really feel there’s a market for these, especially in this size, being affordable for almost everyone.

 How do I go about getting someone to be willing to sell my fragrances in their shop (either online or not) or work with me in promoting mine?

 rsz_dr_samFirstly, congratulations on your perfumes.  I do love an entrepreneurial spirit.  Secondly, before you sell them commercially, do they meet the necessary compliance? There are many perfume ingredients that have been banned by IFRA in order to ensure that scents do not cause rashes or reactions. Forgive me if I’m preaching to the converted- you may well already know this. Thirdly, have you tried Etsy? There are many beautiful handmade scents there and it strikes me as a good starting point.

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Me with Sarah McCartney at the 4160 Tuesdays studio in 2014.

I would really recommend one of the Studio days run by Sarah McCartney of 4160 Tuesdays. What she doesn’t know about making and selling perfume just isn’t worth knowing. You can find out more from the 4160 Tuesdays website.  Oh, and in answer to your question about promoting your scent, my advice is, as you might imagine, harness the bloggers!

That’s all I’ve got room for this week. I hope you enjoyed my first brave fumble into the mailbag. Do you agree with my responses?  Do you have any questions of your own? Do let me know. I always love to hear from you.

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Jean Patou Joy: Here Comes The Heavyweight

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So big and mighty and famous is Joy that I feel almost unqualified to review it. However, as you may know  by now, IScentYouADay is all about my response to a scent, and therefore, like the Gallery Visitor swooning at their first Titian, I am merely reporting as a member of ImageJosephine Public.  Although slightly more scent obsessive, it must be said.

Joy was created in the middle of the Great Depression and was the most expensive perfume in the world. Jean Patou was quite unapologetic about this fact.  You can imagine how it must have gone down in PR terms during post war austerity. That being said, he had the talent to back up his chutzpah.

Joy was indeed costly, not just financially, but environmentally.  One bottle of Joy would use up 336 Roses and 10,600 jasmine flowers. As you can imagine, IFRA have since changed all that.  Lucky old moi, I have in my hands a vintage EDP sample (thank you LW yet again). On smelling Joy, it’s easy to remember that it was created for a woman in the 1930s since this is not a modern smell, and yet, at the same time, it is a timeless classic.

from The Black Narcissus
from The Black Narcissus

First impressions count. I had a burst of Aldehyde, the blatancy of which I hadn’t smelled since Elizabeth Arden Blue Grass. It’s Aldehydes loudly before Peaches and Jasmine barge in. A little Tuberose makes things creamy, and I could have sworn some Lemon was in there, but it seems I am wrong. As the sharpness dies down, the Roses begin to dominate, but with subtlety. They are so perfectly blended with the other ingredients that you couldn’t quite call this a Rose perfume. Or a straight forward floral. Civet is listed, though I found no trace, and the base notes settle down into something that I prefer far and away above the opening notes.

VintageAdBrowser
VintageAdBrowser

Jasmine is loud, Roses are strong to the point of  medicinal,  and sandalwood makes it cosy. A little musk softens all edges into a baby soft floral with the now milder Aldehydes in the background to give it a prickle. It’s easy to see why this has stood the test of time whilst others have fallen. I found Joy  hard to break down into pieces and notes. What Henri Almeras has created is a mood, or a tone. Unabashedly feminine, perfume makers could learn a lot at the knee of Madame Joy. It’s complicated and changeable, but the end result and the final basenotes are simple.

I like Joy, and so do millions of others, making this the second best selling perfume of all time after the ubiquitous Chanel no 5. (which I suppose I’ll have to get round to reviewing at some point. Reluctantly). Incidentally, I have discovered that I love to say “Jean Patou” aloud. It almost sounds like an exclamation: “Jean Patou! That was delicious” or “Jean Patou, look at the rain!” Jean Patou! That’s some good perfume.

You can buy Jean Patou Joy from allbeauty.com or Escentual.

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