Tag Archives: best tuberose fragrance

Ten Bottles Please: L’Absolu Narciso Rodriguez for her EDP 2015

Escentual.com
Escentual.com

Narciso Rodriguez is a rare thing these days: a brand that is as popular with critics as it is with fans.  Even the big name bestsellers have their fair share of critics, but the NR range appears to be pretty universally loved, like Joanna Lumley or Sir David Attenborough.

I was recently sent a sample of L’Absolu NR For Her, (Patsi, was this from you? If so, thank you!)  and despite there being many, many NR flankers, they are good enough to stand alone and are not merely mass churned money spinners.  Narciso Rodriguez Poudre is a particular favourite of mine ( see why here).

labsolu for her

L’Absolu turns up the volume on three of my favourite notes. It opens with powdery tuberose and jasmine, making a fluffy edged cloud of creamy white flowers. The background of white musk starts emerging slowly until it joins the white flowers in size and volume. White flowers and white musk together needs a bit of grounding,  so along come robust patchouli to anchor it down and give this a musky, musty, loud but chic accord that makes me want bottles and bottles of it. There’s a bit of aromatic sandalwood in there too, which just sort of smooths the edges a bit.

labsolu bottleWhat I love about this is that fact that there are many fragrances with jasmine sambac and patchouli out there, and they smell platitudinous i.e. so familiar they all smell the same. Usually, they add vanilla too.

With L’Absolu Narciso Rodriguez For Her, this doesn’t happen.  The ingredients are blended beautifully into a final accord that smells like white soap, clean musk, earthy patchouli, and big tuberose, all in one big beautiful long-lasting flourish.

This makes me feel impeccable, like a proper lady. It won’t go with my school run outfit of jeans and a stripy top. This is what I will wear with grown up clothes and everyone will admire me and want to do my bidding because I am so chic.  When a perfume makes you feel this good, you need to buy it all.

Stockists

L’Absolu Narciso Rodriguez For Her eau de parfum is available from The Fragrance Shop UK, allbeauty and Escentual. Sample was a gift from friend of the blog and of me, Patsi. xxx  Opinions are my own.

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Mary Greenwell Plum

plum

“Fragrance is always the last touch of magic to any look I create”- Mary Greenwell

Mary Greenwell is a successful make up artist who, when looking to expand, took the agreeable route of creating a perfume range rather than a make up range.  As someone who only has five items in her make up bag, but a groaning dressing table whose legs are buckling, I applaud this decision. The nose behind the scent is the legend that is Francois Robert (who is also the nose behind Friedemodin, more of which anon).

Mary Greenwell, House of Fraser
Mary Greenwell, House of Fraser

You could be forgiven for assuming that Plum would be a fruity soliflore- that’s what I was expecting and my heart wasn’t fully in it prior to trying this.  However I couldn’t have been more wrong and Mary Greenwell Plum is actually a complex and feminine scent that unfurls its layers like a dance of the seven veils.

At first spray, Plum has, as you would expect, a dash of plum, but the plum is accompanied by so many friends that it’s is never allowed to completely dominate.  For example, alongside the plum comes peaches, usually a No-Go in my book, but it adds an agreeable booziness here that compliments the citrus notes of Bergamot and lime and strikes a pleasant balance.

Into the middle phase and here come the white flowers- all of them!  Gardenia, rich creamy tuberose, jasmine and orange flower.  It gives a richness to the boozy plum and fruit that to my nose became almost a nuttiness. Just as all these white flowers are blooming away, a chypre accord comes into play and the whole thing settles down into an ambery, mossy symphony, but always with that boozy plum in the background, which serves to enhance rather than distract.

What makes this cleverly put together is its ever changing face, rather aptly for someone in the business of changing faces.  Just when you think you’ve named it, the scent enters another phase which keeps you guessing.

It is, as I say, complex, and all the more intriguing for that.  Mary Greenwell has a range of only four scents: Lemon, Plum, Cherry and Fire.  The Perfume Society has a sample in their Holiday Collection Discovery Box and I know that Jo Fairley is a Mary Greenwell fan.

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I stumbled across Plum by dint of pure serendipity.  In swapping a bottle of scent  online I was offered a bottle of Plum and accepted, knowing nothing about it.  Sometimes the universe just wants you to try stuff.  Oh and did I mention the gorgeous pink and green packaging?  The bottle is in a little stand with a cover, and has a distinctively heavy lid that could break a window.  It exudes both class and playfulness.

Stockists

Mary Greenwell Plum is available from Harrods, Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.com  and Strawberry.net. Prices are very reasonable at under £40 for 50ml.

Update 2017– you can buy Plum from the Fragrance Shop UK, but hutty up. It’s at a great price but limited stcok.

NB Muse in Wooden Shoes wrote a lovely review of Plum and you can find it here.  Also, our dear friend Portia at Australian Perfume Junkies has reviewed it here.

My own lovely bottle
My own lovely bottle

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Dior Poison: If Darth Vader Was A Woman…

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Dior’s Poison blazed the trail for outrageous 80s scents that everyone still remembers.  They typified the 80s era of greed, glitz and excess. You were nobody unless you had shoulder pads, stilettos, and a mobile phone the size of a house brick. The mantra was “More is More” and Poison added it’s volume to the  clamour of noise to ensure anyone who wore it made an entrance.

Some perfumes are born a myth. Provocative and mysterious since its creation, Poison is Dior’s ultimate weapon of seduction.

Meanwhile, many people were wrinkling their noses at this confusing cacophony of perfume notes that were the olfactory equivalent of entering a nightclub whilst watching a television show and listening to music at the same time.

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photo:Wiki

Sometimes I can look at the notes in a perfume and ascertain whether I would like it or not.  This is not a substitute for trying it on skin, but it often helps me make a list of future Must Tries.

If you look at the notes in Poison, it would still be hard to imagine what it smelled like.  Smelling is believing. There’s Plum, Booze, Amber, Patchouli, Jasmine, Roses, Woods, Honey, Incense, Tuberose, Carnation, the kitchen sink, a cuddly toy, a coffee maker and Uncle Tom Cobley and all. I could go on. I can usually smell a hint of Liquorice too.

Poison will swallow up all  its rivals. In a room of a dozen different perfumes, you would only be able to smell the Poison wearer. It obliterates and dominates. Longevity is as long as a prison sentence and harder to reduce.

However, I will go against the grain and say it’s brilliantly done.  It captures an era in a bottle more effectively than a spell. It takes me back to being 15 years old and watching Joan Collins strut her stuff on Dynasty, whilst over on BBC, JR was pouring himself a large Scotch in the middle of the day, and on the news, Diana was all coy glances and dazzling gowns.  One whiff of Poison and I am there.

The bottle is like Cinderella’s pumpkin: full of dark magic.  I don’t want to smell like this, but I am so glad they made it.

Miller Harris Noix de Tubereuse: A Cluedo Mystery Beckons

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 Miller Harris is a high quality brand, and I have yet to be disappointed by any of their scents. Whether I like them all or not, I cannot claim that they are anything other than beautifully put together and of the highest quality. Naturally with a wide range, there will be some I don’t like alongside the many I do.

We can put Noix de Tubereuse into the category of “The Jury’s Still Out”.

I’ve been wearing it for two days now and I’m still not certain about it. Its Tuberose for sure, that much is immediately clear, but there was a question mark over this that I couldn’t quite get past.

The first time I tried it, I thought of biscuits. The second time I thought of Hay or the Nuts (noix) of the title. The more I thought about it the more I thought there  was a kind of savoury note in this (dramatic flashbacks to the savoury note in hideous Womanity *scream face*). There are no nut notes listed in this, but I was sure I could detect the scent or taste of them.

There are several notes in Noix de Tubereuse that could be guilty. One of them is Clover. Could Clover be the culprit? Another is Mimosa, a straw like yellow flower scent. Was that the meanie killing my White Flower buzz?

Then there is Orris root. Not a million miles from the  rooty smell of Iris, maybe it was the Orris root?

Starting to feel like Poirot in a parlour full of suspects, I never did get enough evidence to get to the bottom of what is stopping me enjoying Noix de Tubereuse. It could be a solo culprit, or it could have several accomplices.

If I’m completely honest and ignoring the list of notes, I will say hand on heart, that this smells like Tuberose and Nuts. It really does. And I’m not sure if that’s good or bad.

I’m not in love with it, but I would ask for it’s phone number at a later date. Who knows. I might even give it a call.

Stockists

You can buy Miller Harris Noix de Tuberose from Escentual.com.

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