Tag Archives: best rose perfumes

Yves Rocher Moment de Bonheur: Roses, Roses, Roses

moment de bonheur

  As you may know, I’m a big fan of Yves Rocher and awaiting a parcel for them later this week.  I love that the quality is high and the freebies and special offers are plentiful.

It’s shame there are no stores in the UK and I have had to make a few blind buys, but I have never been disappointed.  I am particularly fond of Yves Rocher Cléa, which, if you’re a fan, smells a bit like Dove and makes for a deliciously creamy, ambery fragrance. Today I am reviewing Yves Rocher Moment de Bonheur, a rather lovely, simple floral. It opens with drunken rose petals.  By drunken I mean that it reminds me of the rose petal perfume I used to make when I was little.  I would collect rose petals from the garden and keep them in a jar of water.  The resulting perfume would not be um…commercial, but it smelled like rose petals that were on the turn: over ripe if you like and on the point of being fermented.  I’m not painting a pretty picture but in fact the rose scent from the stewed and dampened petals really summed up summer for me.

Moment de Bonheur was in fact created for Autumn and was launched in September 2011.  This would make sense, since the base has a hint of spice and warmth in the patchouli and cedar finish.  However, despite the geranium and green notes, Moment de Bonheur, to me will always be roses, roses, roses: stem, leaves and all. It’s light as a petal and borderline soapy in places, but I love it. If you like rose fragrances you can’t go wrong with this one.

photo by theimaginationtree.com
photo by theimaginationtree.com

Tauer Incense Rose: I Could Never Leave You

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It’s hard for me to pick a favourite Tauer: it changes day by day. However, if a cruel person made me only choose one, it would be Incense Rose.

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wiki commons

I have been looking at a lot of rose perfumes recently but this one makes the rose smell so unique, whilst keeping its characteristics.

It opens with a blast of sparkling aldehydes. If Rose and Bergamot were made into sparkling lemonade this is what it would smell like. The opening phase lasts and lasts and then starts to change and move into ecclesiastical territory- which is fine by me as I am huge fan of Comme Des Garcons Series 3 Avignon and I do love a bit of church.  The incense here is High Church and High quality.  I have sat through enough High Masses to vouch for this.

The incense is rich and resinous and makes me think of ancient stone walls and that particular hushed atmosphere of a cathedral.  The rose is still there, but it’s not a pretty rose with frills and lace.  It is the peppery, paper like rose petals that you would find in a good pot pourri. The leaves are faded and fragile, but the scent of rose is there- spicy and dry.

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Civray Church, Poitou Charente-my own photo

The third phase would please any fan of Andy Tauer’s L’Air Du Desert Marocain (or LADDM to fans).  The scent has now become smoky and dry, like the desert mentioned, but still the rose lingers.  What started as a light, zingy aldehyde has matured as the day has worn on, and become a Grand Dame of aged smoky Rose petals. I love a perfume that tells a story and changes as my day changes.  It begins with light optimism and energy and ends as a smoky, sandy sunset with the prickles of petals fading as the scent finally gives up after a fourteen hour day.

As usual with Tauers, ingredients are top quality and longevity is unbeatable.  Wear this and bloom.

Stockists

If you are in the UK, you can buy  both 2ml Tauer samples and full bottles from  Les Senteurs.  In Europe, try the Tauer website, and in the USA, try LuckyScent and even Amazon.com for a slection of Tauer fragrances.

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Andy Tauer PHI Rose de Kandahar-It’s Here!

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I am an unabashed fan of Andy Tauer. That doesn’t mean I blindly love everything he does: for some reason Reverie au Jardin disagrees with me, but I’d pretty much take a Tauer scent any day of the week.

What I love about Tauers is that Andy is a one man show.  He’s not a boardroom full of shirts looking at focus groups and trends.  He doesn’t have to go through a comittee and he’s not part of a global organisation (apart from having a distribution partner).  He’s a lone wolf and that makes things very interesting right from the start.

The development of PHI Rose de Kandahar has been well documented via Andy’s blog and Facebook page and it’s finally available in the UK.  This is a limited edition as Andy’s vat of Rose de Kandaher absolute is not bottomless (hence its inclusion in the “Collectibles” range). So now I finally have my treasured sample. Was it worth it?  Oh yes.

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fragrantica.com

PHI Rose de Kandahar has a Middle Eastern richness to it. Initially it’s honeyed roses and almonds and dried apricots: it reminds me of a scented Souk. At first this edible combination was very Turkish Delight, just for a moment.  But what happens next is that it transforms into, unless I’m mistaken, something not unlike a good Arabian Oud.  I often find Oud too strong for me, but in Rose de Kandahar it’s like a robust backdrop to something altogether more delicate. The irony is that there is no Oud in it, but the combination of tobacco, ambergris, vetiver and patchouli gives this a very rich and almost prickly base.   It’s like serving an aromatic Bacchanalian feast on a rough granite table. The contrast of the rough with the smooth enhances the delicacy of the ingredients.

Here are the notes as listed on Fragrantica:

 apricot, cinnamon,
bitter almond, bergamot

Rose of Kandahar essential oil,
Bulgaria rose absolute, Bourbon geranium, dried tobacco leaves.

patchouli, vetiver, vanilla,
tonka beans, musk, ambergris.

 There is an interesting Feel Good back-story to this.  The Kandahar roses that produce this absolute were grown in Afghanistan by farmers that have been subsidised to produce roses instead of growing plants that provide the base materials for drug use (“Hungerhilfe”). In other words, Make Roses, Not Drugs.

The wonderful fragrance alone is reason enough to love this, but  add the milk of human kindness and  you have just one of the many reasons to love PHI Rose de Kandahar.

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Andy Tauer Une Rose Chyprée : Bring Me Pearls

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I do love a good rose, although a rose soliflore would be too bland for me.  I also love anything with Bergamot in, as well as a good spiky Patchouli and if possible, a bit of Oakmoss from time to time.

Lucky for me then, that Andy Tauer has created Une Rose Chyprée, which is all my favourite things in one big Perfume Sundae. Luckily Andy resisted sticking a cherry on top ( I am so over cherries! See my recent reviews of Delices de Cartier and Louve).

The opening notes of Une Rose Chyprée remind me a little of Noontide Petals.  It must be the Bergamot. Bergamot is so often used in hesperides and  colognes that it’s refreshing to  find it used in a powdery capacity in this floral Chypre.  Used in a similar way to Noontide Petals, the Bergamot has a lovely chalky quality, which I find thirst quenching, like wet chalky cliffs. It’s here in spades in Une Rose Chyprée.

Along with Bergamot comes a prickle of Patchouli and Vetiver, spiky Geranium and of course the Rose. The Rose is so intense that it becomes spicy. In fact, it reminds me of the kind of peppery rose scent that comes from the dried petals of a Tea Rose in a bowl of Pot Pourri. It’s not fresh and dewy, it’s aged, like good antique wood.

Put this together with a touch of Oakmoss and dried Vetiver grass, and you have a wonderfully spicy rose that is anything but bland. The powdery note gives this a charming retro feel. It makes me want to dress up when I wear it. Don your Pearls and lipstick ladies, this is elegant and ladylike.

Once again longevity is excellent. The only reason I kept respraying because I love the wet top note so much as it dries and settles. Une Rose Chyprée is ladylike, yes, but my addiction to it is not.

In the UK Tauer samples are available from Les Senteurs. Image Longevity is excellent, (around 12-14 hours per spray) and this is the Eau de Parfum concentration. Even the samples last over a week of constant daily wear on me, although I generally keep for them for best.

A Footnote Incidentally, Speaking of Tauers, I have just got back from the Hell that is Legoland (“L’Enfer est les Autres” J.P. Sartre). My scent was Carillon Pour Un Ange. It is the total antidote to crowds and hotdogs and commercialisation. I could handle the horrible bustle if I could just smell those Lily of The Valley and go to my happy place. There. I’ll bet you never thought you’d hear Carillon Pour Un Ange and Legoland in the same sentence, did you? Actually, neither did I.