Elizabeth Taylor Diamonds and Emeralds: Almost Nearly Potentially Good

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As you may have realised by now, I am constantly on the trail of a low rent bargain: a high quality gem hiding behind its low price. Sometimes I am lucky, more often than not I am disappointed.  Still, I can always cheer myself up with a squirt of (non cheap) Carillon pour un Ange. It seems to be just what the Doctor ordered of late. It provides great comfort and succour for those moments when you are staring at your new low cost purchase in disillusionment. Again.

ImageSadly, Dame Elizabeth’s glamorous offering, Diamonds and Emeralds is that very purchase. Like a Magpie, I was attracted to the pretty box, the pretty bottle, and the image of Diamonds and Emeralds. Great name, great lady. Fabulous jewellery.

I have previously tried Diamonds and Rubies and found it shockingly bad. It’s in my Perfumed Turkey Hall of Infamy. It’s like being attacked by Peach flavoured Plasticine in a guest toilet that is dressed floor to ceiling in peach lace, right down to the toilet lid and toilet roll holder. It was an assault on my senses and easily one of the worst commercial smells I have ever encountered.

Diamonds and Emeralds isn’t quite as nasty, and starts off showing a great deal of potential. First off, the Gardenia hits you rather prettily. As soon as that has registered, rich, creamy Tuberose comes out to play. Just as I was enjoying the Tuberose and feeling smug about my low cost purchase, along came a gang of aggressive Peaches and sprayed me to death with cheap air freshener. Sadly this synthetic Peach note is the longest lasting phase.  If they had just held back on the Peaches, this could possibly have been a rather old fashioned, inexpensive Tuberose. Not in the same category as the Great Fracas of course, but in a sort of “it’ll do”  category. Madonna made a good attempt at affordable Tuberose in Truth or Dare, but Diamonds and Emeralds is a fleeting waft of synthetics in comparison.

How very sad, since I badly wanted this 80s Dynasty style diamanté encrusted bottle on my dressing table, but I’m afraid it might scare the good stuff away.

The only pleasure I had from Diamonds and Emeralds was found in looking at the photographs of the real McCoy at the auction of Dame Elizabeth’s jewellery. How wonderful to look on such a masterpiece.  I guess nothing was ever going to match up to the real thing.

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iscentyouaday

4 Comments

  1. Dearest Iscent
    Oh my giddy aunt…. we really are starting to sync! Well almost.
    The Dandy was thinking and posting on Dame Liz’s much (from the sound of things) preferable aldehydic retro number ‘White Diamonds’.
    There’s nothing worse than a poorly executed tuberose. But there are some good cheapies out there, I quite enjoy older lots of original Chloe.
    Yours ever
    The Perfumed Dandy

    • Dear Mr Dandy,

      How peculiar, that’s nearly twice in a week! I feel confident today that you are not about to review the rather wry Karleidoscope by Karl Lagerfeld. It has some amusing quirks, more of which anon.

      I get the feeling with Liz Taylor that the follow up line to White Diamonds had the “Difficult Second Album” syndrome. The excellent White Diamonds seems to have bagged all the quality, leaving none left over for the lacklustre follow ups. I so wanted it to work, but found myself at the sink, washing arms again.

      A poorly executed tuberose is indeed a disappointment but you have named an excellent Tuberose in Chloe Original. It’s a remarkable price for a perfume of excellent quality. I believe I reviewed it before I understood Tuberose, so I may have to revisit that one. Similarly, I didn’t “get” powdery fragrance until I could recognise a good chypre. I tell you, I have learnt so much, and am leanring still!

      Your friend
      IScent

  2. I have not enjoyed any of Miss Taylor’s fragrances with the exception of White Diamonds and Passion for Men. Those too are very nice cheapies in my book. I am sorry that the diamonds and emeralds turned out to be zircons.

    • Thanks lanier, the wonderful packaging and great adverts put me in mind of the phrase “all mouth and no trousers”. In the UK that’s not as rude as it looks written down! :-)

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